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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
is not simply the debt ceiling. what we are facing is the sequestration, the automatic cuts of a trillion dollars over 10 years, which many republicans are seeing a willingness, expressing willingness to let set in at the end of march, and that will mean another fight and struggle. all this will unfold in probably six months. i think he is in a good position to fight for the next six months. >> there was an interesting and little noticed thing this week. economic members in britain came out, where they have had a very tough austerity program. now they are possibly entering into a triple dip recession. it is an example, perhaps, of too much austerity. franceay be an example of too much non-austerity. but if we go through sequester, people will see what those cuts mean. i think there would be a rebellion over it. >> you could hardly accuse the united states of indulging too much in austerity. we have added $5 trillion in debt. >> i am not saying that. i am saying that what we have at this moment is a decision of how much to cut and where. the democrats are recalcitrant about entitlements. r
the debt ceiling until may 19, then resetting the cap to cover any borrowing over the current limit-- $16.4 trillion. and for now, republicans will not force immediate spending cuts. the party's new strategy would achieve that goal by forcing congress to pass a budget. house budget committee chair-- and last year's vice presidential nominee-- paul ryan. >> here's the point, we have a law, it's called the budget act, it requires that congress passes a budget by april 15. all we're saying is, "congress, follow the law, do your work, budget. and the reason for this extension is so we can have the debate we need to have." >> ifill: as added incentive, the house bill says, if there is no budget, then lawmakers won't get paid. after it passed today by a bipartisan vote of 285 to 144, speaker boehner said he's optimistic that will happen. >> if both chambers have a budget. democrat budget from the senate, republican from the house now you've got competing visions, for how we address this problem. out of those competing visions, we're going to find some common ground. >> ifill: but house minority
they would only raise the debt ceiling by a dollar for every dollar cut in snding. now they said never mind. we'll push that down the road. the big fight will be on the sweeping spending cuts that go into effect march 1 and on the government funding that runs out on march 27. march is going to be the month to watch, and it's a month that could end in a government shutdown. >> ifill: is it the kind of fight the republicans want to have to redefine themselveses? >> i think they do. gwen, i think you have to know when to hold them and know when to fold them. yes, the republicans folded on this wise wisely. finally, i think they got some smart on this. you have to pick your fights. they need a breather now they'vbeen on the defense f a year on tax cuts for millionaires, on toughness, shutting down the government, they're not going to compromise. they need to recalbright here, a reset button needs to be pushed and it seems like in every aspect of government. and fight on future spending, not on obligations already incur. >> ifill: in the inaugural address this week, we saw the president lay out
between it legs. i haven't heard anything from s&p or moodies who say we want the debt ceiling to go higher. everybody watching this show who has cut back 0, government has to learn how to do the same thing. it's cowardly in washington to continue to hide behind the notion that we're going to collapse overnight as a nation if we don't keep spending ourselves to death. >> i agree. congressmen have basically sent a message that today is not the day we're going to stop spending our children's and grandchildren's money, and charles is exactly right. the reason why our credit got downgraded is because of our out of control spending and out of control debt. the fiscal cliff deal even we just witnessed, it's such -- added four trillion dollars to our deficit over the next ten years. so, congress is not serious about reigning in spending and that's exactly when the we need to too. >> but they're not doing it. >> they're not doing it. and it neils hunky dorie. that's just it. >> the markets aren't. >> the markets are hunky doory for a few reasons. it's pause of the global economy. markets wen
's republicans a-- house republicans agreed to suspend the debt ceiling. a measure that the democratically controlled senate agreed to vote on. we went to capitol hill to meet with senator mac thornberry of texas who's the number two republican. i asked him what he thought about the guidance and whether it answered the questions that gop members have been raising. >> not really. i think a lot of us wanted dod to be serious about explaining the effects of sequestration before we ever got to this point and that would have in our judgment helped motivate people to find another way. other spending cuts to take the place of the sequestration. and i still think there are a lot of questions as the services work through there with some -- this with some accounts exempt. some not. some are going to be hit pretty hard. >> overall from a good fashion and at least trying to make clear that some of those are going to be dramatic cuts? >> it was a beginning but i still think there are lots of details to be fleshed out that most people including most members of congress don't fully appreciate. just how p
house says president obama will not veto it. the debt ceiling is the limit on how much the feds can borrow. republican leaders were refusing to raise it without an equal amount of spending cuts. but the bill they just passed has a new ultimatum for the house and the senate. no budget, no pay. carl cameron in the d.c. newsroom tonight. how is this supposed to break the gridlock? >> hey, shep. it's basically a two-part deal. the first says by april 15th, both the house and the senate each have to pass a budget that balances in 10 years. should either chamber fail then its members paychecks can't be delayed. they can't stop it constitutionally they have to get paid. the other part suspends enforcement of the federal debt limit until may 19th, at which point it will increase retroactively without any offset in spending cuts. here is how speaker john boehner summed it up today. >> you know, the premise here is pretty simple. it says that there should be no long-term increase in the debt limit until there is a long-term plan to deal with the fiscal crisis that faces our country. >> and no
, the largest in u.s. history, or if you can use the debt ceiling, which you cannot in the end pull the trigger on, because even though you could probably go without technical default for months and months, it would be catastrophic. it would mean you'd have to cut spending by 40% overnight which you can't do. so unless you can execute the bluff, don't do it because obama will call it, as he called it on january 1 of this year, as he would with the debt ceiling. don't -- if you can't carry out the bluff. i hope you weren't plauding carrying out the bluff, in which case my entire argument is undermined and has gone nowhere. >> i think that's a small contingent against suicidal charges. >> and they are on suicide watch. i hope their shoelaces have been removed. [laughter] >> so you do what i think the house members and their retreat in williamsburg very cleverly did. you pick your fights and don't try to govern from one house to get very small advances. i thought i recommended last week that in return for a temporary debt ceiling hike of three months, they demand that the senate produce a budget.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)